Articles Posted in ERISA

April is Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month, which makes it a fine time to talk about the organization that provides information, support and education for those who suffer from Parkinson’s Disease (PD) as it provides a wealth of information useful in a disability claim.

The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF) works to find a cure, to advance research, to increase knowledge, to empower the community and to ensure that those living with the disease enjoy the best quality of life possible. http://www.pdf.org/en/mission

This organization can provide valuable information for our clients and their families on topics that include: understanding the illness, coping with a recent diagnosis, managing PD and support for care partners and family. These are just a few examples of the many resources available on the PDF’s website. The website also offers helpful suggestions on living with PD and coping with the trials and difficulties that result from suffering from this progressive condition.

One of the first questions we ask clients calling about the denial of medical benefits is whether the provider (i.e. hospital, treatment center, doctor) was an in-network or ­out-of-network provider. Some insurers use different terms such as participating provider or contracted provider. These terms all mean that the insurance company, or its claims administrator, has negotiated with the provider for a certain rate of reimbursement. Insurance companies negotiate these rates of reimbursement with certain providers so that there is an expectation – from both the insurance company and the provider – of the amount that will be paid for medical services.

For patients who are seeking benefits for medical services, a provider’s network status is important because it affects how much the patient will pay out of pocket for treatment. When patients use an out-of-network provider, there is an additional coinsurance, or charge, that patients must pay out of pocket. This coinsurance can range from 20% to 50% of the eligible charges. Eligible charges are a lesser amount determined by any number of factors in the insurance policy, such as Medicare rates. So when patients receive bills from the provider, or statements from the insurance company, which show that only a fraction of the out-of-network provider’s charges were paid, the reason is that the eligible charge was determined to be less than the billed charges and a coinsurance applied. This can dramatically reduce what the insurance company will pay for an out-of-network claim.

Here are some tips for reducing out-of-pocket medical expenses:

A 2014 study of Canadian workers revealed that most individuals vastly underestimate the likelihood that they will become disabled. While nearly half of workers surveyed believe that disability occurs rarely, in reality over 14% of Canadians are currently on disability, while roughly 33% of individuals will experience a period of disability lasting longer than 90 days during their working lives.

While this study only involved Canadian workers, there is no reason to believe the same statistics, and the same lessons, can’t be applied to American workers.

Mark Hardy, senior manager of Life and living Benefits at RBC insurance stated that “research indicates that Canadians are overly optimistic about avoiding a disability and lack of understanding reinforces the need for more education around this critical issue.”

Trumpcare, the Republicans’ proposed plan to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) — also known as “Obamacare” — will cut mental health and addiction treatment for 1.3 million people, just as the country is struggling to cope with an epidemic of opiate addiction. The Washington Post reported on March 9, 2017, that House Republicans admitted under questioning by Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-MA) that their ACA repeal-and-replace plan would remove a requirement to offer substance abuse and mental-health coverage that’s now used by at least 1.3 million Americans.

Substance abuse and mental-health services are among the “essential benefits” states are required to provide under the ACA’s expansion of Medicaid, a program that provides health-care coverage to those who cannot afford it. As the article explained, if states opt out of providing those benefits, Medicaid recipients would not only lose coverage for mental-health care, but also coverage for care aimed at addressing substance abuse treatment, a critical area of care given the current drug overdose epidemic many states are dealing with. According to estimates by health-care economists, about 1.3 million Americans’ sole access to these services is through the ACA.

 

[o3odj]

As health care litigators, we are often asked about the benefits of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA” aka Obamacare). The bottom line is that more people have received more comprehensive coverage through the Affordable Care Act because of the following measures:

  1. No preexisting exclusion. Health plans can no longer charge more or deny coverage to you or your child because of a pre-existing health condition like asthma, diabetes, or cancer. https://www.hhs.gov/healthcare/about-the-law/pre-existing-conditions/index.html
  2. Young adults can remain as dependents on their parents’ health plans until age 26. Young people generally do not have access to sufficient individual health plans and do not have careers that provide the opportunity for an employer based plan so the opportunity to remain on a parent’s health plan is a great benefit. http://www.forbes.com/sites/emilywillingham/2017/01/25/have-a-teenager-you-should-worry-about-aca-repeal/#4a89ca150604

Insurance denial, ERISA denial, claim denied
Every insurance policy requires that you give notice of your claim for benefits to the company before benefits can be paid.  It doesn’t matter if the claim is for medical services, disability benefits, life insurance, fire, flood, theft, etc. Obviously, notice and information about your claim is necessary before the insurance conpany can process and pay the claim. Policies also usually require that notice of a claim be given within a specified time period following the loss, for example, “30 days,” or “as soon as practicable,” or “as soon as reasonably possible,” etc.  Again, this is fair because evidence related to the claim is fresh, and most readily available nearer the time of the event.

But, what happens if you can’t, or don’t comply with the policy notice requirement?  What happens if don’t give notice until months, or even years after your claim accrued?

Good questions.

Eating disorders are a serious public health concern in the United States and around the world. At least 30 million people in the United States will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their life. And eating disorders don’t just impact women.  Approximately 10 million men in the United States will face an eating disorder in their lifetime. But despite the staggering number of people affected and the reality that eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, eating disorders often live in the shadows and most people don’t get the help they deserve. Unfortunately, all too often people will not seek out treatment due to stigma, misperceptions, lack of education, diagnosis and access to care.

Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder are the most prevalent eating disorders. These eating disorders and all other eating disorders will be in the spotlight from February 26th, 2017 – March 4th, 2017 when patients, families, practitioners, advocates and educators celebrate National Eating Disorders Awareness Week. This year’s theme is “It’s Time to Talk About It” and the goal is for more people to get screened and start getting the help they need.

From the famed Empire State Building in the east, to Los Angeles International Airport’s stylish, 100-foot, glass pylons in the west, 61 iconic landmarks in cities across the country will be lit in the signature blue and green colors of the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) to put a spotlight on the seriousness of eating disorders.

One of the most common mistakes we see with long term disability (“LTD”)  denials (ERISA and non-ERISA/bad faith) is claimants rushing to submit their appeal. The desire to move quickly is understandable:

  • You have no money coming in;
  • You are angry at the insurance company and want to give them a piece of your mind;

Many of the “rules” governing ERISA claims are not contained in the statute itself, but rather are the result of judicial decisions interpreting ERISA. In the landmark case of Firestone v. Bruch, 489 U.S. 101 (1989), the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the right of an ERISA fiduciary (including insurance companies!) to reserve “discretion” to decide eligibility for benefits under an ERISA plan. When “discretion” is granted to an insurance company or a claims administrator, a reviewing court does not decide whether or not the claimant is entitled to benefits under an insurance policy. Instead, a court is limited to deciding whether the insurance company abused its discretion or acted “unreasonably” when deciding the claim.   Under this standard of review, some courts have concluded they are compelled to uphold the insurer’s decision merely because there was some medical support for the decision. See, Carlo B v. Blue Cross Blue Shield, 2010 WL 1257755 (D. Utah, 2010 (It does not matter whether the Court agrees with the insurer or its physicians. The decision need not be the only logical decision or even the best one.)

After years of unfair decisions under this standard of review, some states, including California, have taken action. Effective January 1, 2012, the California legislature outlawed discretion in policies. California Insurance Code, Section 10110.6. The statute applies to any policy which “issued or renewed” after January 1, 2012 and which covered residents of California.  What this means is that courts can now actually look at the evidence and decide for themselves whether they think an insured person is entiteld to benefits.  This is called a “de novo” proceeding, meaning the court will look at the evidence “anew” instead of deferring to what the insurance company decided. (See one of our earlier blogs for more info: http://www.californiainsurancelawyerblog.com/2015/03/california_insurance_code_sect_1.html )

Insurance companies such as MetLife, Liberty Life, Prudential and others have tried making all kinds of arguments to avoid the impact of section 10110.6. Application of the statute can depend on the facts of the case, but, since January 1, 2012, Kantor & Kantor has been successful in persuading many Federal Judges, and even insurance company lawyers, to invalidate or ignore grants of discretion written into insurance plans. A number of other experienced ERISA practitioners have also been successful in this argument. To date, the statute has been applied in at least 15 court decisions in California.

Donald Trump has just been sworn into office as this country’s 45th president, and Barack Obama is a private citizen once again. Now that Obama is gone, will his signature legislative achievement follow close behind him?

If conservatives have their way, the Affordable Care Act (ACA), commonly known as Obamacare, will be a blip in our nation’s history. Under Obama, the Republican-controlled House of Representatives voted more than 60 times to repeal the ACA, and during his presidential campaign Trump repeatedly vowed to get rid of it.

Of course, this is all easier said than done. Many parts of the ACA are very popular, including the provisions that prevent insurers from denying coverage based on pre-existing conditions, and those that allow parents to keep their children on their coverage until age 26.

Contact Information