Articles Posted in Eating Disorder Claims

There may come a time in your life when you will need to consult with a lawyer – whether it be good news or bad news. We routinely speak with individuals who have had life, health, and disability claims denied by their insurance companies. Understandably, this is a very difficult time for the individuals who call us. We understand that, and try to make the process simple…but we need your help.

As lawyers, we are well-versed in the practice of law, but we rely on the information from our clients to steer us in the right direction and guide each case. It takes TEAMWORK to get a successful outcome for our clients.

Here are a few tips for talking to your lawyer and sharing with them what they need to know.

For over 25 years, I have been representing individuals who have had life, health, and disability claims denied by their insurance companies.   I have represented over 3,000 people.   What is so disheartening to me is that I hear from clients again and again that they “almost gave up before calling” me. They tell me they were beaten down by the process, convinced their insurance company must be right, or that they didn’t know there were lawyers who specialized in handling their kind of case on a contingent basis.   While sometimes the client HAS waited too long for us to help them, usually my law firm, Kantor & Kantor, is able to step in and successfully resolve their claim.

However, I wonder just how many DO give up unnecessarily.   While my view of the insurance industry may appear very cynical, I am 100% convinced that the industry employs a strategy of denying as many claims as possible in the hope that claimants will just give up and go away.   I could write pages upon pages of stories about clients who had almost given up, but for whom we were able to obtain benefits with nothing more than a well written letter.   It sometimes seems like the insurance company is daring their insured to challenge the denial, or to get a lawyer.   If they do, the insurance company will reconsider its denial. If not, the denial will stand and the insurance company will keep the benefits which are rightfully yours.

In the last month, I have obtained over a $1,000,000 in total benefits for several clients who separately told me that they had seriously considered giving up before calling my firm.   This led to me to come back to a familiar thought, which was to wonder about all the people who did simply give up.   I decided to write this blog in the hope that maybe ONE insured might read it, and decide not to give up.   I am not writing this to get business. I have more than I need.   I practice in California, but this blog might be read by someone in Florida, or Illinois, or New Jersey, for example. If it is, and you were considering giving up trying to get your benefits, I am not suggesting you call me.   Go on the internet, or call your State Bar, and find an experienced attorney in your State.   The worst thing that happens, is that no one will take your case  —  but what if they will?

One of the first questions we ask clients calling about the denial of medical benefits is whether the provider (i.e. hospital, treatment center, doctor) was an in-network or ­out-of-network provider. Some insurers use different terms such as participating provider or contracted provider. These terms all mean that the insurance company, or its claims administrator, has negotiated with the provider for a certain rate of reimbursement. Insurance companies negotiate these rates of reimbursement with certain providers so that there is an expectation – from both the insurance company and the provider – of the amount that will be paid for medical services.

For patients who are seeking benefits for medical services, a provider’s network status is important because it affects how much the patient will pay out of pocket for treatment. When patients use an out-of-network provider, there is an additional coinsurance, or charge, that patients must pay out of pocket. This coinsurance can range from 20% to 50% of the eligible charges. Eligible charges are a lesser amount determined by any number of factors in the insurance policy, such as Medicare rates. So when patients receive bills from the provider, or statements from the insurance company, which show that only a fraction of the out-of-network provider’s charges were paid, the reason is that the eligible charge was determined to be less than the billed charges and a coinsurance applied. This can dramatically reduce what the insurance company will pay for an out-of-network claim.

Here are some tips for reducing out-of-pocket medical expenses:

Trumpcare, the Republicans’ proposed plan to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) — also known as “Obamacare” — will cut mental health and addiction treatment for 1.3 million people, just as the country is struggling to cope with an epidemic of opiate addiction. The Washington Post reported on March 9, 2017, that House Republicans admitted under questioning by Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-MA) that their ACA repeal-and-replace plan would remove a requirement to offer substance abuse and mental-health coverage that’s now used by at least 1.3 million Americans.

Substance abuse and mental-health services are among the “essential benefits” states are required to provide under the ACA’s expansion of Medicaid, a program that provides health-care coverage to those who cannot afford it. As the article explained, if states opt out of providing those benefits, Medicaid recipients would not only lose coverage for mental-health care, but also coverage for care aimed at addressing substance abuse treatment, a critical area of care given the current drug overdose epidemic many states are dealing with. According to estimates by health-care economists, about 1.3 million Americans’ sole access to these services is through the ACA.

 

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As health care litigators, we are often asked about the benefits of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA” aka Obamacare). The bottom line is that more people have received more comprehensive coverage through the Affordable Care Act because of the following measures:

  1. No preexisting exclusion. Health plans can no longer charge more or deny coverage to you or your child because of a pre-existing health condition like asthma, diabetes, or cancer. https://www.hhs.gov/healthcare/about-the-law/pre-existing-conditions/index.html
  2. Young adults can remain as dependents on their parents’ health plans until age 26. Young people generally do not have access to sufficient individual health plans and do not have careers that provide the opportunity for an employer based plan so the opportunity to remain on a parent’s health plan is a great benefit. http://www.forbes.com/sites/emilywillingham/2017/01/25/have-a-teenager-you-should-worry-about-aca-repeal/#4a89ca150604

Insurance denial, ERISA denial, claim denied
Every insurance policy requires that you give notice of your claim for benefits to the company before benefits can be paid.  It doesn’t matter if the claim is for medical services, disability benefits, life insurance, fire, flood, theft, etc. Obviously, notice and information about your claim is necessary before the insurance conpany can process and pay the claim. Policies also usually require that notice of a claim be given within a specified time period following the loss, for example, “30 days,” or “as soon as practicable,” or “as soon as reasonably possible,” etc.  Again, this is fair because evidence related to the claim is fresh, and most readily available nearer the time of the event.

But, what happens if you can’t, or don’t comply with the policy notice requirement?  What happens if don’t give notice until months, or even years after your claim accrued?

Good questions.

Eating disorders are a serious public health concern in the United States and around the world. At least 30 million people in the United States will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their life. And eating disorders don’t just impact women.  Approximately 10 million men in the United States will face an eating disorder in their lifetime. But despite the staggering number of people affected and the reality that eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, eating disorders often live in the shadows and most people don’t get the help they deserve. Unfortunately, all too often people will not seek out treatment due to stigma, misperceptions, lack of education, diagnosis and access to care.

Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder are the most prevalent eating disorders. These eating disorders and all other eating disorders will be in the spotlight from February 26th, 2017 – March 4th, 2017 when patients, families, practitioners, advocates and educators celebrate National Eating Disorders Awareness Week. This year’s theme is “It’s Time to Talk About It” and the goal is for more people to get screened and start getting the help they need.

From the famed Empire State Building in the east, to Los Angeles International Airport’s stylish, 100-foot, glass pylons in the west, 61 iconic landmarks in cities across the country will be lit in the signature blue and green colors of the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) to put a spotlight on the seriousness of eating disorders.

On January 13, 2017, the Los Angeles Times published a column entitled Healthcare insurance hell: If at first your claim is denied, try, try again

The article describes on insured’s extreme difficulty in obtaining approval for treatments of her multiple autoimmune disorders that cause chronic pain, migraines, extreme dizziness and debilitating chronic fatigue. As the title shows, the main thrust of the argument is to never give up if your health insurance claim is denied – however, this advice is not only applicable to health insurance claims – the same holds true, believe it or not, for Long Term Disability, Long Term Care, and even Life Insurance claims!  

Some interesting additional information is also included in the column:

Kantor and Kantor LLP was nominated and has now been awarded the 2015 Best of Business Award for the Small Business category.

The Small Business Community Association has been dedicated to empowering and recognizing small business owners who make a difference in their respective communities since 2006.

We are honored to accept this award and grateful that our firm is recognized in this way.

Kantor & Kantor is honored to announce the selection of four attorneys from the firm for the 2015 Southern California Super Lawyers list. Inclusion in this list is reserved for attorneys who exhibit distinct excellence in their practice.

Super Lawyers, a prominent attorney rating service, identifies exceptional lawyers from more than 70 practice areas. The selected attorneys have attained substantial peer recognition and widespread professional achievement. The extensive and multiphase process used to determine 2014 California Super Lawyers relies on peer nominations, evaluations, and independent research.

All four lawyers were selected for their successes in representing people denied disability – particularly those with disabling conditions such as eating disorders, autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Multiple Sclerosis, cancer and mental illness – as well as assisting people recover benefits under long-term care, health and life insurance policies. This recognition and honor demonstrates the talent, dedication, and diligence of these attorneys; all of which they utilize to obtain the insurance benefits to which their clients are entitled.

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