Articles Posted in Insurance Bad Faith

When you think of what lawyers do for a living, the first thing you probably think of is arguing over a case in front of a judge.

You may be surprised to learn, then, that in the federal courts this staple of practicing law seems to be on the way out. The federal district courts – the trial courts of the federal system – are increasingly holding fewer and fewer oral arguments. Some district courts even have a standing default rule that they won’t hear oral argument on a motion unless the presiding judge explicitly asks for it.

This trend is even more accentuated in the federal circuit courts – the appellate courts of the federal system. While the Supreme Court of the United States holds oral argument in almost all of its cases, the circuit courts of appeal do not.

As you know, churches occupy a special place in the law. For example, the First Amendment bars the government from prohibiting the free exercise of religion, and churches, indeed almost all religioous institutions, get special tax treatment from the IRS.

However, you may not know that this distinction can also affect your employee benefits. Almost all employee benefits are governed by a federal law called ERISA (the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974). This law provides various protections, including imposing a fiduciary duty on your employer to act in your best interests in administering your benefits.

However, if you are a beneficiary of an employee benefit plan established by a church (or other religious organization), your benefits are not governed by ERISA, because ERISA has an exemption for “church plans.” (There is also an exemption for government plans.) As a result, you may lose protections under ERISA if you are a church employee.

There may come a time in your life when you will need to consult with a lawyer – whether it be good news or bad news. We routinely speak with individuals who have had life, health, and disability claims denied by their insurance companies. Understandably, this is a very difficult time for the individuals who call us. We understand that, and try to make the process simple…but we need your help.

As lawyers, we are well-versed in the practice of law, but we rely on the information from our clients to steer us in the right direction and guide each case. It takes TEAMWORK to get a successful outcome for our clients.

Here are a few tips for talking to your lawyer and sharing with them what they need to know.

For over 25 years, I have been representing individuals who have had life, health, and disability claims denied by their insurance companies.   I have represented over 3,000 people.   What is so disheartening to me is that I hear from clients again and again that they “almost gave up before calling” me. They tell me they were beaten down by the process, convinced their insurance company must be right, or that they didn’t know there were lawyers who specialized in handling their kind of case on a contingent basis.   While sometimes the client HAS waited too long for us to help them, usually my law firm, Kantor & Kantor, is able to step in and successfully resolve their claim.

However, I wonder just how many DO give up unnecessarily.   While my view of the insurance industry may appear very cynical, I am 100% convinced that the industry employs a strategy of denying as many claims as possible in the hope that claimants will just give up and go away.   I could write pages upon pages of stories about clients who had almost given up, but for whom we were able to obtain benefits with nothing more than a well written letter.   It sometimes seems like the insurance company is daring their insured to challenge the denial, or to get a lawyer.   If they do, the insurance company will reconsider its denial. If not, the denial will stand and the insurance company will keep the benefits which are rightfully yours.

In the last month, I have obtained over a $1,000,000 in total benefits for several clients who separately told me that they had seriously considered giving up before calling my firm.   This led to me to come back to a familiar thought, which was to wonder about all the people who did simply give up.   I decided to write this blog in the hope that maybe ONE insured might read it, and decide not to give up.   I am not writing this to get business. I have more than I need.   I practice in California, but this blog might be read by someone in Florida, or Illinois, or New Jersey, for example. If it is, and you were considering giving up trying to get your benefits, I am not suggesting you call me.   Go on the internet, or call your State Bar, and find an experienced attorney in your State.   The worst thing that happens, is that no one will take your case  —  but what if they will?

As health care litigators, we are often asked about the benefits of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA” aka Obamacare). The bottom line is that more people have received more comprehensive coverage through the Affordable Care Act because of the following measures:

  1. No preexisting exclusion. Health plans can no longer charge more or deny coverage to you or your child because of a pre-existing health condition like asthma, diabetes, or cancer. https://www.hhs.gov/healthcare/about-the-law/pre-existing-conditions/index.html
  2. Young adults can remain as dependents on their parents’ health plans until age 26. Young people generally do not have access to sufficient individual health plans and do not have careers that provide the opportunity for an employer based plan so the opportunity to remain on a parent’s health plan is a great benefit. http://www.forbes.com/sites/emilywillingham/2017/01/25/have-a-teenager-you-should-worry-about-aca-repeal/#4a89ca150604

Insurance denial, ERISA denial, claim denied
Every insurance policy requires that you give notice of your claim for benefits to the company before benefits can be paid.  It doesn’t matter if the claim is for medical services, disability benefits, life insurance, fire, flood, theft, etc. Obviously, notice and information about your claim is necessary before the insurance conpany can process and pay the claim. Policies also usually require that notice of a claim be given within a specified time period following the loss, for example, “30 days,” or “as soon as practicable,” or “as soon as reasonably possible,” etc.  Again, this is fair because evidence related to the claim is fresh, and most readily available nearer the time of the event.

But, what happens if you can’t, or don’t comply with the policy notice requirement?  What happens if don’t give notice until months, or even years after your claim accrued?

Good questions.

Eating disorders are a serious public health concern in the United States and around the world. At least 30 million people in the United States will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their life. And eating disorders don’t just impact women.  Approximately 10 million men in the United States will face an eating disorder in their lifetime. But despite the staggering number of people affected and the reality that eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, eating disorders often live in the shadows and most people don’t get the help they deserve. Unfortunately, all too often people will not seek out treatment due to stigma, misperceptions, lack of education, diagnosis and access to care.

Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder are the most prevalent eating disorders. These eating disorders and all other eating disorders will be in the spotlight from February 26th, 2017 – March 4th, 2017 when patients, families, practitioners, advocates and educators celebrate National Eating Disorders Awareness Week. This year’s theme is “It’s Time to Talk About It” and the goal is for more people to get screened and start getting the help they need.

From the famed Empire State Building in the east, to Los Angeles International Airport’s stylish, 100-foot, glass pylons in the west, 61 iconic landmarks in cities across the country will be lit in the signature blue and green colors of the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) to put a spotlight on the seriousness of eating disorders.

One of the most common mistakes we see with long term disability (“LTD”)  denials (ERISA and non-ERISA/bad faith) is claimants rushing to submit their appeal. The desire to move quickly is understandable:

  • You have no money coming in;
  • You are angry at the insurance company and want to give them a piece of your mind;

Why pass on free personalized advice?

One of the people who contacted us this week was a woman who had her Long Term Disability benefits terminated by Standard Insurance Company after Standard had paid her those benefits for many years. Despite multiple surgeries, her symptoms had not improved. Each morning she takes powerful pain medications. Sometimes those medications offer enough relief to enable her to attend to daily functions, but often, they do not.

Either way, she was certainly not able to perform the duties of her job when Standard cut off her benefits. Nonetheless, Standard Insurance Company all of the sudden determined she had not provided sufficient proof of disability and terminated her Long Term Disability benefits. Thinking this was simply a misunderstanding, she appealed the denial on her own without speaking to an attorney first. After all she reasoned, Standard Insurance Company had told her all she needed to do was explain to them why she was still disabled.

On January 13, 2017, the Los Angeles Times published a column entitled Healthcare insurance hell: If at first your claim is denied, try, try again

The article describes on insured’s extreme difficulty in obtaining approval for treatments of her multiple autoimmune disorders that cause chronic pain, migraines, extreme dizziness and debilitating chronic fatigue. As the title shows, the main thrust of the argument is to never give up if your health insurance claim is denied – however, this advice is not only applicable to health insurance claims – the same holds true, believe it or not, for Long Term Disability, Long Term Care, and even Life Insurance claims!  

Some interesting additional information is also included in the column:

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