Articles Posted in Property & Casualty Insurance

When a homeowner obtains insurance, she generally assumes the insurance company will accurately estimate the cost of rebuilding the home in the event of a disaster such a fire. Unfortunately, this is not often the case. Insurance companies rely on computer programs to generate an estimated cost to rebuild in an area. Some insurance companies will calculate the amount based solely on the square footage and age of the home. If an appraiser is not sent out when insurance is requested to inspect the home, upgrades such as vaulted ceilings, wood beams, updated kitchens and baths, hardwood floors, outdoor kitchens, finished basements or attics, or other enhancements will not be included in the amount allotted to rebuild your home.

Courts often decline to reform the insurance policy to fix errors in the estimated replacement cost, noting that the homeowner should have reviewed and contested the amount when she received the policy. Insurance policies often have extended policy limits that will add an additional 25% on the insured amount for just these situations. However, an additional 25% may not be enough to rebuild.

The West Coast is an especially high cost of living area, and that includes construction costs. The San Francisco Bay Area, for example, is currently the most expensive area of the country for new construction, with construction costing an average of $417/sq ft. Construction costs in California have been rising 5-6.3% per year. This is especially true in areas at high risk of wildfires. While many of those areas are more rural and populated with homes that are less expensive than those in major cities, the repeated years of fires and construction have affected the cost of construction in those areas.  It routinely costs $300-$350/sq ft to rebuild in rural wildfire areas.  Years of fires have created a huge demand for construction labor, and chronic shortages of materials.  County offices are also overwhelmed with permit requests. Delays have increased to the point that the California Department of Insurance has mandated that for wildfire disasters, the time provided by insurance companies to rebuild and to pay Additional Living Expenses be extended from 24 to 36 months.

The riots throughout the United States have been heartbreaking on a number of levels. While the social and political implications will be something our country grapples with for years into the future, the economic effects will be felt immediately.

Small businesses, already devastated by the pandemic and government-mandated shutdowns, are now having to deal with damage from riots and looting.  How are businesses going to recover from this double assault on their bottom line?

Ideally, most businesses have insurance to provide security in the event of riots or looting.  However, many insurance policies have exclusions of or limits on activities that could be viewed as “terrorism.”  We do not yet know how insurers will categorize the riots.

Kantor & Kantor has established a regular, live, and interactive Zoom conversation to discuss generally and answer questions from the public about long-term disability, health insurance, pensions, life insurance, casualty (homeowners), and more.  BenefitsChat will be live on Wednesday evenings from 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm Pacific Time.

Host Andrew Kantor, his fellow Kantor & Kantor attorneys, and select guests will explain and discuss everything from “big picture” concepts, such as the distinctions between different ways of obtaining insurance, to case-specific concepts designed to help individuals protect their rights.

While there is always a demand for legal information, current events have created an unparalleled need for as many real, live, helping hands as are available to be lent—even if the hand can only be safely lent via webcam. This forum will give people the chance not only to learn from our attorneys and each other; but to do so within the safety and comfort of a like-minded and supportive group of individuals and their families.

Fire season is beginning again in California, and soon throughout the West. Thousands of people are still trying to recover and rebuild from the years of past fires and related devastation. It is often taking three or more years to rebuild a home because of difficulties obtaining permits, contractors, and materials.

Ideally, your insurance company will work with you in this difficult time in your life. You will need to obtain a copy of your insurance policy and review it carefully. This can be harder than it seems if you have just lost all your possessions in a fire, as you may not even have access to a computer for some time. It is important to understand that the amount the insurance company set to insure your house may be much less than it would cost to rebuild your house. The insurance company will also only pay to rebuild your house as it was before, it will not pay for upgrades.

You will be asked to provide lists of the contents of your home. Then the insurance company will likely only reimburse you for the “actual cash value” of the possessions you lost in the destruction of your home, which removes depreciation from the value of your items. If your policy covers it, once you actually replace the item, you may receive a second payment covering that depreciation. But if you do not replace the item, you never will.

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