October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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On average, every 2 minutes a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States.

  • In 2020, an estimated 276,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women in the U.S. as well as 48,530 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.
  • 64% of breast cancer cases are diagnosed at a localized stage (there is no sign that the cancer has spread outside of the breast), for which the 5-year survival rate is 99%.
  • This year, an estimated 42,170 women will die from breast cancer in the U.S.
  • Although rare, men get breast cancer too. In 2020, an estimated 2,620 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year in the U.S. and approximately 520 will die.
  • 1 in 8 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime
  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women, except for skin cancers. It is estimated that in 2020, approximately 30% of all new women cancer diagnoses will be breast cancer.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an annual worldwide campaign to increase awareness of the disease and highlight the importance of breast awareness, education, and research. Since March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has affected just about every aspect of life, including screening, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care for breast cancer.

Many women have been faced with the decision of whether to skip or postpone routine mammograms during the current pandemic to avoid potential exposure to the coronavirus.

Breast cancer is one of the most treatable forms of cancer when caught early. Mammograms and other diagnostic techniques for breast cancer save lives—and it is crucial to get them on time. Getting regular screening tests is the most reliable way to find breast cancer early. The American Cancer Society has screening guidelines for women at average risk of breast cancer, and for those at high risk for breast cancer.

If you have been diagnosed with breast cancer, your treatment team will discuss your treatment options with you. Typically, treatment plans are based on the type of breast cancer, its stage, and any special situations. Your treatment plan will depend on other factors as well, including your overall health and personal preferences.

Most women with breast cancer will have some type of surgery to remove the tumor. Depending on the type of breast cancer and how advanced it is, you might need other types of treatment as well, either before or after surgery, or sometimes both. Some treatments are local, meaning they treat the tumor without affecting the rest of the body.

Drugs used to treat breast cancer are considered systemic therapies because they can reach cancer cells almost anywhere in the body. They can be given by mouth or put directly into the bloodstream. Depending on the type of breast cancer, different types of drug treatment might be used, including:

If you or someone you know is suffering from breast cancer, or any other illness, and you are being denied benefits by your insurer, please call Kantor & Kantor for a free consultation at 888-569-6013 or use our online contact formWe understand, and we can help

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