Articles Tagged with accidental death

Life insurance is one of those things we buy because we want the peace of mind that comes from knowing those we leave behind will be financially protected should something terrible happen to us.  But more often than you might think, insurance companies find ways to deny claims for life insurance benefits!

In simple terms, Life Insurance comes in two forms: 1) Traditional Life Insurance, and 2) Accidental Death and Dismemberment Insurance.

Traditional Life Insurance is what most people think about when they think of life insurance.  This type of coverage will pay a death benefit to the policy beneficiary(ies) when someone dies due to almost any cause, but there are exclusions.  Most policies will not pay a benefit for death by suicide within the first two years from the policy purchase.

Over the years, courts deciding ERISA cases involving accidental death due to autoerotic asphyxiation have issued mixed opinions as to whether benefits should be payable. In a recent decision, Wightman v. Securian Life Ins. Co., No. CV 18-11285-DJC, 2020 WL 1703772 (D. Mass. Apr. 8, 2020), a district court upheld the denial of accidental death benefits due to the insured’s death caused by autoerotic asphyxiation gone awry.

Plaintiff Anne Wightman sued Securian Life Insurance Company after it denied the accidental death benefit claim filed as a result of her husband, Dr. Colin Wightman. This policy expressly excluded death when caused directly or indirectly by, among other things, “suicide or attempted suicide, whether sane or insane . . . intentionally self-inflicted injury or attempt at self-inflected injury, while sane insane” and “bodily or mental infirmity, illness or disease.”

Dr. Wightman had been in therapy since the late 1990’s for his interest in sexual asphyxia. Dr. Wightman told his wife about his interest in “sex-related strangulation” in 2007 after he engaged in a sexual encounter that led to a complaint to the police, and Dr. Wightman losing his job. Dr. Wightman sought mental health treatment as a result from June 2007 through April 2010. He also was prescribed medication to help treat his addiction, which he took through 2015. The court noted that records from his mental health treatment highlighted Dr. Wightman as having “high risk sexual behavior [that] has led to possibility of charges for sexual assault.”

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