Articles Tagged with insurance coverage

A recent 2018 American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) study published findings about insurance approval and appeal outcomes at a large-volume proton therapy center, one of the estimated 111 proton therapy centers worldwide. The study showed that proton therapy prior authorization rates were substantially higher for Medicare patients vs. privately insured patients — 91% vs. 30% approval on initial request, at a median 3 days and 14 days from inquiry to determination.

Of the 306 patients initially denied coverage, 276 appealed the decision, and denial was overturned for 189 patients (68%; median time, 21 days from initial inquiry).

It is absolutely essential that proton therapy providers put together strong appeal letters for their patients to increase the chances that insurance decisions are overturned during the administrative claims/appeals review process.  If a patient is insured under an ERISA-governed plan then the administrative record becomes, in some cases, the only evidence that a court can examine if proton therapy is denied on appeal leading to civil litigation.

We recently wrote about how the Trump administration wants to expand the use of social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, in evaluating disability claims. In that post we noted that Kantor & Kantor proved, in Court, that social media posts are of limited value in deciding if someone is unable to work. What did the Court say?

The issue came before Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers, United States District Court Judge in the Northern District of California. She was asked to decide if our client had proven he was disabled by back and leg pain of unknown origin. For years our client struggled to continue working as a tax professional at Hitachi despite ever increasing back and leg pain. This job required high cognitive ability, including critical thinking, decision-making, complex problem solving, and high levels of concentration.

He underwent multiple back surgeries, but this did not give him pain relief. In order to get some degree of pain relief, he had to take opioid medications. While this somewhat helped the pain, a medication side effect was difficulty concentrating. Because of the pain and inability to concentrate, our client’s work performance suffered. He had to stop working.

In honor of  ME/CFS week, we are happy to highlight the newest tool in the fight to not only treat but also recognize chronic fatigue and related conditions: The Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test, also known as iCPET.

As those familiar with ME/CFS and other related conditions may be aware, “traditional” CPET is the gold standard for objectively measuring the limitations caused by chronic fatigue and the impact those limitations have on an individual’s ability to work. Dr. Christopher Snell and the incredible people at the Workwell Foundation have been administering (and improving) this test for years. Despite the plethora of peer-reviewed data confirming CPET’s objective effectiveness in measuring such limitations, insurers still do their best to disregard and minimize CPET.

In contrast to the CPET, which only requires being hooked up to “external” sensors, the iCPET involves the additional insertion of pulmonary artery and radial artery catheters before administering the test. This allows for “complete cardiopulmonary hemodynamic and peripheral tissue O2 extraction analyses, without which only the degree of impairment (maximum Vo2) and the identification of a pulmonary mechanical limitation to exercise are possible.

In honor of MS Awareness Week, we would like to devote this blog to successfully proving and establishing a disability claim based on Multiple Sclerosis.  We find that most of our clients who have MS have struggled to remain at work, but then reach a point where they can no longer continue. In such circumstances, the carrier may ask “what changed?”  It is helpful to show that the condition deteriorated even though the client struggled to remain at work. There are steps you can take to help document the progression of the disease:

  1. Make sure that your doctor’s records accurately describe your symptoms.  Many feel that they do not have to describe their fatigue, migraines, muscle weakness, etc. on each visit to their physician(s) because the symptoms are just naturally a part of the disease. This is true, but your medical records must contain a description of the symptoms you are experiencing.  If the medical records do not contain an accurate description, a subsequent letter from your physician may be perceived as inconsistent with the medical records.
  2. If you are experiencing “adverse” side effects from your medication, this should also be reported to your physician. Again, many do not report unpleasant side effects because they are to be expected. However, the side effects and their disabling potential should be accurately described in the medical records.

While we certainly do not recommend it, you may choose to handle your own short term disability or long term disability claim. A side note: we strongly recommend you do not handle an STD or an LTD appeal without legal representation.

If you decide to make a disability claim on your own, there are a few things you should keep in mind when dealing with an insurance company: (1) insurance companies are for-profit businesses with an eye on profits; (2) everything you provide to them during your claim goes into your claim file; and (3) you cannot rely on an insurance company to obtain documentation to support your claim.

Why are these things so important?

Before the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, also called ACA or Obamacare, under the guise of making health insurance more affordable, health insurers whittled away at the health services covered by individual and small group health plans. Slowly but steadily, health plans covered fewer and fewer services. Individual and small group health plans were a vulnerable target for health insurers. The purchasers of these plans do not have the same bargaining power a large employer does, and often were given insurance with substantially less favorable terms than large group policies. ACA was enacted in part to ensure that all individual and small group plans provide meaningful health insurance coverage.

To accomplish this goal, ACA requires all non-grandfathered health plans in the individual and small group markets to cover ten Essential Health Benefits. The Essential Health Benefits are:

  1. Ambulatory patient services – Medical treatment one receives without being admitted to a hospital. An example would be a check-up at a doctor’s office, or minor surgical procedures that do not require an overnight hospital stay. The size of a plan’s network may vary, but it must be “sufficient” to meet ACA guidelines

Surveillance is a common tool insurance companies use to gather information about long-term disability claimants. It can feel creepy to know the insurer may scan through your Facebook posts, run a background check on you, or even hire an investigator to follow you. Here are some common types of surveillance used, and advice about surveillance for anyone on disability.

Three Common Types of Surveillance

An insurance company may use different kinds of surveillance depending on how much money it is willing to spend to investigate a claim, what kind of activity it expects to uncover, and the type of disability.

Most people with long term disability (“LTD”) insurance obtain that coverage through their employer. Thus, most of us are stuck with whatever insurance company and policy our employer chooses to purchase. And while you might think to yourself, “they’re all the same, so who cares which insurance company my employer decides to go with,” nothing could be further from the truth.

LTD insurance policies vary widely depending on which insurance company is issuing the policy. Some companies offer good, comprehensive coverage that treats every type of disability more or less the same. Under these policies, regardless of whether your disability is due to physical or psychiatric reasons, you will be paid LTD benefits as long as you remain disabled under the terms of the policy.

Most LTD policies, however, will differentiate between physical disabilities and psychiatric disabilities. If your disability is “due to” a mental and nervous condition, or worse yet simply “caused or contributed to by” a mental and nervous condition, most insurers will only pay you LTD benefits for a maximum of 2 years (versus paying until age 65 for a physical disability). This distinction provides LTD insurance companies with one of their favorite tactics: They will cut off benefits for people under the 2 year limitation by arguing that while you might have some physical problems, the real reason you can’t work is because you’re suffering from depression/stress/anxiety.

Insurance is our safety net.

It’s our protection against the unthinkable. Our first line of defense when something goes wrong. Our safeguard for our health and our finances. Our security for our family and our homes. Our precaution against all the “what ifs.” Our surety in protection of our resources and access to healthcare and treatment.

On paper, health insurance sounds pretty anticipative and hopeful. It sounds like if an illness or tragedy were to strike, things would be okay in the end – because someone would be there to catch you. But the harsh reality seems to be a security net with many holes and many flaws. In the hands of insurance companies, so many people seem to be falling through the holes of the net, slipping through the worn out spaces, and some even missing the net completely as they fall.

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