Articles Tagged with insurance

Most people with long term disability (“LTD”) insurance obtain that coverage through their employer. Thus, most of us are stuck with whatever insurance company and policy our employer chooses to purchase. And while you might think to yourself, “they’re all the same, so who cares which insurance company my employer decides to go with,” nothing could be further from the truth.

LTD insurance policies vary widely depending on which insurance company is issuing the policy. Some companies offer good, comprehensive coverage that treats every type of disability more or less the same. Under these policies, regardless of whether your disability is due to physical or psychiatric reasons, you will be paid LTD benefits as long as you remain disabled under the terms of the policy.

Most LTD policies, however, will differentiate between physical disabilities and psychiatric disabilities. If your disability is “due to” a mental and nervous condition, or worse yet simply “caused or contributed to by” a mental and nervous condition, most insurers will only pay you LTD benefits for a maximum of 2 years (versus paying until age 65 for a physical disability). This distinction provides LTD insurance companies with one of their favorite tactics: They will cut off benefits for people under the 2 year limitation by arguing that while you might have some physical problems, the real reason you can’t work is because you’re suffering from depression/stress/anxiety.

Insurance denial, ERISA denial, claim denied
Every insurance policy requires that you give notice of your claim for benefits to the company before benefits can be paid.  It doesn’t matter if the claim is for medical services, disability benefits, life insurance, fire, flood, theft, etc. Obviously, notice and information about your claim is necessary before the insurance conpany can process and pay the claim. Policies also usually require that notice of a claim be given within a specified time period following the loss, for example, “30 days,” or “as soon as practicable,” or “as soon as reasonably possible,” etc.  Again, this is fair because evidence related to the claim is fresh, and most readily available nearer the time of the event.

But, what happens if you can’t, or don’t comply with the policy notice requirement?  What happens if don’t give notice until months, or even years after your claim accrued?

Good questions.

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