Articles Tagged with Kantor & Kantor

Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among women in the United States and is the second leading cause of death among women after lung cancer. On average, every 2 minutes a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States.

Group life insurance is a common benefit provided by employers to their workers. But unlike a private life insurance policy, your coverage is contingent on you remaining an employee. So when you stop working at that employer, what happens to your life insurance coverage?

There are multiple ways to keep your life insurance coverage from your employer once your employment ends, but it is important to choose the correct option. The possibilities might include conversion, continuation, or porting the coverage. Each of these will be specifically defined in your life insurance policy along with the procedure and conditions for exercising that option. Carefully consider each option available to determine what best fits your needs. An experienced employee benefits attorney can help you understand your life insurance policy if you have questions.

You Can Convert

I highly recommend the NPR series, “Bill of the Month,” which offers an expert analysis of medical bill surprises. This month’s bill concerns jaw surgery and a hospital bill of more than $27,000. The patient, Ely Bair, had a condition requiring two jaw surgeries. The first jaw surgery went very well and Bair paid his out of pocket maximum of $3,000 and his employer’s health plan with Premera Blue Cross covered the rest.

Bair’s second jaw surgery was with the same hospital and the health insurer was also Premera. But this time, Bair received a bill of $27,119 from the hospital.

The reason is in the fine print. Although Bair was covered under Premera policies for both surgeries, he changed employers between the two surgeries. Although both employers used Premera, the insurance coverage provided by Premera was different with each employer. The second Premera plan had a lifetime maximum of $5,000 for this jaw surgery. That left Bair responsible for the rest of the hospital bill. When he appealed, Premera pointed him to the specific language in the 80-page policy that addresses the lifetime maximum for this specific surgery.

The United States Department of Education recently announced it would forgive the student debt of more than 300,000 disabled borrowers. Could this impact your long-term disability benefits?

The topic this pertains to is offsets (amounts that can be subtracted) that insurance carriers are allowed to take from their claimants’ benefits. The “Other Income” provision of your group long-term disability policy sets forth the types of “income” a claimant might receive that the carrier would be allowed to offset – subtract – from the benefit it pays.

Typically, group LTD policies list things like: Social Security Disability Income benefits, Dependent Social Security Disability Income benefits, Workers’ Compensation benefits, certain pension benefits, and income from third party settlements, among others. The claimant must notify the carrier when he or she receives these benefits and the carrier will then calculate the amount it gets to offset, as well as whether it believes it has “overpaid” the claim.

I want to preface this blog post by saying that I do not have a long-term disability. However, for 16 years of my life, I suffered a life-threatening illness –an illness that I was told that I would either a) die from or b) never fully recover from. Time and time again during those 16 years, I was told to give up hope for any semblance of a normal life, or just resign to dying prematurely. For 16 years, I believed that I should not have hope and there came a point in my journey when I finally gave up all hope and I resigned myself to dying. As fate would have it, on the very same day that I had resigned myself to dying, I ended up having life-changing encounters with human beings who inspired me to fight back and begin the journey to reclaim my hope. Reclaiming my hope was not easy, to say the least. It took me two long and arduous years to reclaim my health and to restore hope, overcoming the odds that were stacked against me. One of those odds was my insurance company –it had told me time and again that I was not sick enough to have my medically necessary treatment covered by insurance. Those two years of fighting for myself, fighting back against the mental defeat I felt because of insurance telling me that I didn’t deserve benefits, during those two years, there were times when it was incredibly hard to hang on to any semblance of hope. I had to remind myself that, “Hope exists. If for no other reason than the Dictionary says it’s a word.”

After I fully healed from the illness, I took my newfound hope and went on to serve as Policy Director on Capitol Hill for a small non-profit dedicated the illness that I had once suffered. In that role, I advocated to raise awareness of that disease, and to get a Federal Bill passed on behalf of people suffering that disease. Once again, the odds were not stacked in my favor. I ended up spending over 10 years advocating with that tiny non-profit on Capitol Hill. During that time, I lost more people to the disease than I can count (meaning, they died), and I heard from people all across the country who had lost loved ones to that disease. Trust me when I say, despite my faith in God, it was not always easy to remain hopeful –I admit that, at times, my hopeful spirit dimmed. But finally, in December 2016, provisions from the bill passed. That day in December was one of jubilation…and yet of humble quiet. The passage of the bill was subdued because it was long-overdue and long-awaited for 16 years, especially by the family after whose daughter the bill was named. The bill was named after Anna Westin who died in 2000 after insurance denied benefits for her treatment.

On ‘the Hill,’ I learned many things. One of the most eye-opening things I learned was: No matter how worthy the cause, the odds are stacked against you if you want to get a bill passed. In fact, in 2016, out of the 12,000+ pieces of legislation that were introduced, only 3% (three percent) passed/were enacted into law.

Glioblastoma, also known as glioblastoma multiforme, is an aggressive type of cancer that can occur in the brain or spinal cord. Glioblastoma can occur at any age but tends to occur more often in older adults. Many glioblastoma symptoms develop slowly and get worse over time. Common symptoms may include:

  • Headaches
  • Loss of appetite

Here at Kantor & Kantor, we like to refresh and give updates to certain parts of the process we use to help individuals. We feel that the more people understand their insurance benefits, the better they will be able to fight when benefits are denied. Long-term disability (LTD) insurance is a large part of this process, so we will explain the basics here.

Long-term disability insurance is an insurance policy that protects an employee from loss of income in the event that he or she is unable to work due to illness, injury, or accident for a long period of time.

LTD can provide benefits for work-related accidents or injuries that are covered by Workers’ Compensation insurance, but there usually will be an offset, where the LTD benefit is reduced dollar-for-dollar by the amount of Workers’ Compensation payment. LTD also does cover an employee in the event of a personal accident such as a car accident or a fall.

When the disability insurance attorneys at Kantor & Kantor, LLP see what is happening with those whose COVID-19 symptoms are continuing for more than a month, they know that there is a good chance that long-term disability claims will be denied. Because of this, we have developed the COVID Longhaulers Legal Resource Center.

In fact, the symptoms that Longhaulers are experiencing match many of the same disabling symptoms those living with autoimmune diseases such as ME/CFS, Dysautonomia, POTS, and more.

Since the symptoms dovetail, we are confident that the inevitable problems and denials with the long-term disability insurance providers will follow suit.

Aaron Monheim, age 34, lives in Spokane, Washington with his wife and three year old daughter. In 2019, Aaron was diagnosed with aggressive relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis which has been unresponsive to medications and leaves Aaron partially disabled due to frequent flares and relapses.

Aaron’s physicians recommended him to receive a treatment called hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, found to be particularly suited for his form of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. The treatment will effectively reset his immune system so it will no longer attack his central nervous system. The treatment is also less costly than the traditional medications for multiple sclerosis which have been unsuccessful for Aaron.

Despite having been referred to the treatment by his own Kaiser doctor, Aaron’s health plan, Kaiser Permanente, has denied benefits for the treatment claiming the treatment is not necessary or suited for Aaron’s condition.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system). In MS, the immune system attacks the protective sheath (myelin) that covers nerve fibers and causes communication problems between your brain and the rest of your body. Eventually, the disease can cause permanent damage or deterioration of the nerves.

Signs and symptoms of MS vary widely and depend on the amount of nerve damage and which nerves are affected. Some people with severe MS may lose the ability to walk independently or at all, while others may experience long periods of remission without any new symptoms. While there is no cure for MS, treatments can help speed recovery from attacks, modify the course of the disease, and manage symptoms.

The National MS Society estimates that more than 2.3 million people have a diagnosis of MS worldwide and approximately 1 million people over the age of 18 in the United States have a diagnosis of MS.

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