Articles Tagged with mental health

For Immediate Release

May 7, 2020

Kantor & Kantor, LLP and Dawson & Rosenthal, P.C. FILED A COMPLAINT in the United States District Court, Central District of California on behalf of their client Sovereign Health, a Gold Star Award winning healthcare provider that treated mental health, substance abuse, and dual diagnosis patients . The $1.125 billon suit alleges that Health Net, Centene Corporation, attorneys from Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, and others engaged in practices that are in violation of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO); Conspiracy to Violate RICO; Intentional Interference with Prospective Economic Advantage, Violation of Unfair Competition Law; and Slander.

Millions of people are affected by mental illness each year. While 1 in 5 people will experience a mental illness during their lifetime, everyone faces challenges in life that can impact their mental health. As the increase in the number of COVID-19 cases affects our entire country, so too will the need for access to mental health treatment and awareness of mental health issues. So far, older adults, along with those who have underlying health conditions, have been hit the hardest by the COVID-19 outbreak, with many developing severe, life threatening illnesses. Another group that is expected to be acutely affected by the pandemic include those who have severe mental illness.

Mental illness is a real and treatable set of conditions that includes major depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders, panic attacks, generalized anxiety disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia, among dozens of others. These disorders are serious enough to significantly impact a person’s daily life functioning, whether at school, work or in their relationships with others.

Mental health issues often coincide with a unique set of challenges that make it difficult for people to access even the most necessities, such as food, medications, stable housing, and healthcare. Combined, all these factors put people with severe mental illness at a much higher risk for contracting and transmitting the new coronavirus and dealing with COVID-19.

As we might expect during this time of pandemic, state governments are not able to make progress on many pressing issues. In January, California governor Gavin Newsom unveiled a $47 billion proposal to expand health care coverage to all Californians. However, the coronavirus scourge has sidelined that proposal as California has scrambled to find funds to respond to it.

Due to these funding pressures, Governor Newsom has asked lawmakers to prioritize their legislative agendas and focus on the outbreak. One senator, however, is pushing ahead with a proposal to protect Californians suffering from mental illness.

As reported by Kaiser Health News, California State Senator Jim Beall, who is the chair of the Senate Select Committee on Mental Health, wants to toughen state parity laws to ensure that patients with mental illnesses are provided benefits on par with those received by patients with other medical conditions. California and the federal government already have mental health parity laws on the books, but Senator Beall argues that they are not stringent enough and are poorly enforced.

The past few months have heralded an unprecedented situation. Millions of Americans are being laid off as COVID-19 shuts down businesses throughout the nation. This is frightening for everyone.  It is doubly difficult for workers who have physical or mental limitations.  For those workers, the specter of finding a new job in this economy, one that can accommodate their often significant limitations, may be overwhelming.

Workers experiencing health issues — including cognitive issues or mental illnesses — who have been having difficulties performing their jobs because of those limitations but have been fighting through them, may well be among the first to be laid off as underperformers. While these workers are in fact impressive in their drive to keep working in the face of daunting health issues, that very refusal to admit defeat may result in unemployment and a lack of income for them.

If you are among these workers, now is the time to evaluate whether a disability claim makes sense for you. While you still have access to your job-related insurance, you can preserve some of your income and access to health insurance.  If you have ongoing medical issues for which you have already been treating that significantly impact your ability to work, be it physical pain, chronic illness, depression, anxiety, or auto-immune issues, talk to your doctor about whether he or she would recommend disability for you.

The COVID-19 pandemic has uprooted the lives of millions of Americans in many ways and has taken its toll physically and mentally on millions of Americans across the country. But for people who suffer from mental health issues, the COVID-19 pandemic has created a new wave of panic, chaos, stress, and uncertainty.

More than 2 million Americans are estimated to be affected by obsessive compulsive disorder (“OCD”), according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Nearly 7 million people in the U.S. are affected by generalized anxiety disorder and about 6 million people in the U.S. are affected by panic disorder. Fear and anxiety about COVID-19 can be overwhelming and cause stress in both adults and children.

Stress during COVID-19 might include:

In this unprecedented time of COVID-19, one thing hasn’t changed: the disparity between medical and mental health care. As a physician is quoted in the New Yorker article, Why Psychiatric Wards Are Uniquely Vulnerable to the Coronavirus by Masha Gessen: “What has really kept me awake at night is that there is always, always less consideration for psychiatric services than for medical services.”

The fact is that mental health treatment is different, it requires patients to decidedly not self-isolate but to be in community for everything from group therapy sessions to meals. Those differences make it harder to treat mental health patients in a global pandemic where isolation and distancing is part of prevention. Health insurers are challenged to accept this new norm, as temporary or permanent as it might be, and adjust its coverage requirements to the reality of evolving treatment settings and protocols.

If you or a loved one is experiencing difficulties working with your insurance company, please call us at 800-449-7529 for a free consultation with one of the attorneys who specializes in getting individuals the mental health care they deserve.

 

Parents, educators and clinicians are seeing an alarming increase in mental health problems among young people. An ongoing topic of discussion among educators, medical health professionals and politicians is what can be done to curb this problem.

Following similar moves in Florida, Oregon and Utah, a recently introduced bill in the California State Legislature would allow students time off to treat or attend to mental health needs. Senate Bill 849, written by California State Senator Anthony Portantino (D-La Cañada Flintridge), would allow students in elementary school through high school time out of school to treat or attend to mental health needs without risk of being considered truant, a violation that could lead to penalties for students and fines for parents.  Under California’s current education code, mental and behavioral health problems are not eligible for excused absences.

Studies show that a rising number of school-age children in California are struggling with depression, anxiety or thoughts of self-harm. According to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is the second-leading cause of death among young people ages 15-24. The CDC reported in 2017 that the number of girls 15-19 committing suicide had doubled from 2007 to 2015. The statistics cited show 5.1 suicides per 100,000 in that age group — a 40-year high. The boys suicide rate in that age group climbed 30 percent, to 14.2 per 100,000, in the same time period.

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Thursday, October 10 is World Mental Health Day. First celebrated in 1992, the day was set up by the World Federation for Mental Health to educate and raise awareness of mental health issues for people around the world.

Each year the event has a different theme. Suicide prevention is the primary focus for the 2019 theme for World Mental Health Day. Here are some key facts and figures about suicide from the World Health Organization:

  • Suicides are preventable.

Suicide is a Leading Cause of Death in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) WISQARS Leading Causes of Death Reports, in 2017:

  • Suicide was the tenth leading cause of death overall in the United States, claiming the lives of over 47,000 people.
  • Suicide was the second leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34, and the fourth leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 35 and 54.

Today the nation’s largest suicide prevention organization, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (“AFSP”), responded to the Federal Communications Commission’s (“FCC”) Report on the National Suicide Hotline Improvement Act to the U.S. Congress with this statement by John Madigan, AFSP Senior Vice President and Chief Public Policy Officer:

“We applaud the FCC, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and Veterans Affairs (VA) for their work to analyze the effectiveness and the feasibility of a 3-digit hotline number. We agree with the initial conclusion of the FCC’s Report to Congress: that a universal, easy-to-remember, 3-digit phone number will make it easier to connect people in crisis with life-saving resources. AFSP is calling on the relevant congressional oversight committees of the Congress to continue their due diligence on this critical issue and immediately schedule a hearing to address the FCC’s recommendation to designate “988” as a new 3-digit number as there are significant questions and concerns which should be addressed, namely: Network Limitations – The North American Numbering Council’s Report to the FCC recognized that “988 likely cannot be deployed ubiquitously across all networks” in the United States and the FCC conceded that network upgrades and technology replacements will be necessary to “ultimately [make] the use of 988 as a designated suicide prevention and mental health crisis hotline ubiquitous” nationally.

The AFSP noted that, “It’s essential that a mental health and suicide prevention crisis number be nationally available for all individuals in crisis,” and they asked, “How will these gaps in national coverage be addressed so access is available regardless of geographic location?”

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