Articles Tagged with Out-of-Network

The internet provides patients with the resources to locate healthcare providers anywhere in the world. But whether your health insurance pay benefits for treatment with a health care provider anywhere in the world is another issue. Patients are often unhappily surprised when they discover that their health insurance policy limits them to healthcare only within their state or within the health insurance company’s network of providers.

The first step to understanding your health insurance coverage is requesting a copy of the policy. The policy dictates your healthcare coverage. Review your policy to learn whether your policy provides benefits if you go out of state, or out of the country, or see an out-of-network provider for treatment.

If the policy limits you to in-network or in-state benefits and you find a healthcare provider that is perfect for your needs, don’t lose hope. If you can show that there is no in-network or in-state health provider appropriate to treat you, you have a good argument for asking for out-of-network or out-of-state coverage even if the policy only approves in-network or in-state providers. The best argument will demonstrate that there are no in-network providers willing to take new patients or it is outside of their area of expertise. This argument will require through research through many telephone calls to in-network providers to determine whether they will accept the patient. Similarly with out-of-state providers, the argument requires research to demonstrate that there are no in-state providers available.

For Immediate Release

May 7, 2020

Kantor & Kantor, LLP and Dawson & Rosenthal, P.C. FILED A COMPLAINT in the United States District Court, Central District of California on behalf of their client Sovereign Health, a Gold Star Award winning healthcare provider that treated mental health, substance abuse, and dual diagnosis patients . The $1.125 billon suit alleges that Health Net, Centene Corporation, attorneys from Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, and others engaged in practices that are in violation of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO); Conspiracy to Violate RICO; Intentional Interference with Prospective Economic Advantage, Violation of Unfair Competition Law; and Slander.

One of the first questions we ask clients calling about the denial of medical benefits is whether the provider (i.e. hospital, treatment center, doctor) was an in-network or ­out-of-network provider. Some insurers use different terms such as participating provider or contracted provider. These terms all mean that the insurance company, or its claims administrator, has negotiated with the provider for a certain rate of reimbursement. Insurance companies negotiate these rates of reimbursement with certain providers so that there is an expectation – from both the insurance company and the provider – of the amount that will be paid for medical services.

For patients who are seeking benefits for medical services, a provider’s network status is important because it affects how much the patient will pay out of pocket for treatment. When patients use an out-of-network provider, there is an additional coinsurance, or charge, that patients must pay out of pocket. This coinsurance can range from 20% to 50% of the eligible charges. Eligible charges are a lesser amount determined by any number of factors in the insurance policy, such as Medicare rates. So when patients receive bills from the provider, or statements from the insurance company, which show that only a fraction of the out-of-network provider’s charges were paid, the reason is that the eligible charge was determined to be less than the billed charges and a coinsurance applied. This can dramatically reduce what the insurance company will pay for an out-of-network claim.

Here are some tips for reducing out-of-pocket medical expenses:

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