Articles Tagged with Suicide prevention

On Friday September 25, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a law that strengthens and expands mental health parity protections in California. This law amends the California Mental Health Parity Act by adding significant new protections that are good news for participants in both group and individual healthcare insurance policies (including disability policies that cover healthcare), and bad news for insurance companies that have continued to unfairly deny medically necessary coverage for the treatment of mental health and substance use disorders. Co-Founding Partner Lisa S. Kantor, working with other mental health advocates and one of the bill’s sponsors, was instrumental in the development of this law.

Among other highlights, the new law now covers all generally recognized mental health disorders as well as substance use disorders, whereas the prior law only covered a list of nine mental health disorders that were deemed severe. The legislature found the prior list was “not only incomplete and out-of-date, but also fails to encompass the range of mental health and substance use disorders whose complex interactions are contributing to overdose deaths from opioids and methamphetamines, the increase in suicides, and other so-called deaths of despair.”

The law clarifies that insurers must cover treatment at all intermediate levels of care for mental health and substance use disorders, including residential care, partial hospitalization, and intensive outpatient treatment. The legislation expressly cites two groundbreaking decisions in cases brought by Kantor & Kantor’s Co-Founding Partner  Lisa KantorHarlick v. Blue Shield of California, and Rea v. Blue Shield of California – in which courts in California required residential treatment be covered under the prior law. Nevertheless, insurers have continued to insist that the California Mental Health Parity Act does not mandate necessary residential treatment for mental health disorder patients, an argument that should no longer be viable.

September 6 – 12, 2020 is the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s (AFSP) annual National Suicide Prevention Week. This year’s message is: #KeepGoing. AFSP reminds us all that there are simple things we can each do in order to protect and safeguard our mental health, and that together, we can make a difference on the mental health of our community and those around us. . . and…together we can #KeepGoing!

As someone who overcame years of contemplating suicide as an option, and as who has lost too many people to suicide to name herein, suicide prevention is personal to me –as I am sure it is to many of you reading this. So, please do what feels right to you this National Suicide Prevention Week –get involved in ways that nourish your Self and soul. ~ And, please, most importantly: if you are struggling with ideas of taking your life or completing suicide…please do not follow-through. I know how it feels like the only option. But I am here to tell you that I will never regret not following through on the thoughts. There is hope for you – hope for your brighter days ahead and for a life free from thinking that the world would be better off without you. Indeed, you are very necessary. Get help today if you need help -you deserve it.

During this week of advocacy, education, story sharing, remembrance and more, AFSP encourages us to:

National Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (“PTSD”) Awareness Month is commemorated annually in June. The month is dedicated to raising awareness of PTSD and how to access treatment. June 27 is also recognized annually as PTSD Awareness Day.

According to the National Center for PTSD, between 7 and 8 percent of the population will experience Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during their lifetime. Men, women, and children can experience PTSD as a result of trauma in their lives. Events due to combat, accidents, disasters, and abuse are just a few of the causes of PSTD. No matter the reason, PTSD is treatable, but not everyone seeks treatment, or some people seek treatment and they are denied benefits by their health insurer.

Common symptoms of PTSD might include:

Two decisions this week emphasize the importance of submitting treating physician and patient statements in support of an ERISA administrative appeal. For ERISA health cases involving medical necessity denials, an appeal which gets to the heart of why treatment was medically necessary is crucial and can actually determine the course of the lawsuit.

In Katherine P. v. Humana Health Plan, Inc., No. 19-50276, __F.3d__, 2020 WL 2479687 (5th Cir. May 14, 2020), the Fifth Circuit revived life into a claim by a young woman seeking mental health benefits for partial hospitalization treatment. Katherine received partial hospitalization treatment in 2012 for multiple mental health disorders including an eating disorder. Humana paid for the first 12 days of partial hospitalization treatment and then denied benefits, claiming such treatment was no longer medically necessary based on two Mihalik Criteria.

The Fifth Circuit found that judgment for Humana was improper because the administrative record showed a genuine dispute as to whether Katherine satisfied one of the Mihalik Criteria, ED.PM.4.2.

The COVID-19 pandemic has uprooted the lives of millions of Americans in many ways and has taken its toll physically and mentally on millions of Americans across the country. But for people who suffer from mental health issues, the COVID-19 pandemic has created a new wave of panic, chaos, stress, and uncertainty.

More than 2 million Americans are estimated to be affected by obsessive compulsive disorder (“OCD”), according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Nearly 7 million people in the U.S. are affected by generalized anxiety disorder and about 6 million people in the U.S. are affected by panic disorder. Fear and anxiety about COVID-19 can be overwhelming and cause stress in both adults and children.

Stress during COVID-19 might include:

Parents, educators and clinicians are seeing an alarming increase in mental health problems among young people. An ongoing topic of discussion among educators, medical health professionals and politicians is what can be done to curb this problem.

Following similar moves in Florida, Oregon and Utah, a recently introduced bill in the California State Legislature would allow students time off to treat or attend to mental health needs. Senate Bill 849, written by California State Senator Anthony Portantino (D-La Cañada Flintridge), would allow students in elementary school through high school time out of school to treat or attend to mental health needs without risk of being considered truant, a violation that could lead to penalties for students and fines for parents.  Under California’s current education code, mental and behavioral health problems are not eligible for excused absences.

Studies show that a rising number of school-age children in California are struggling with depression, anxiety or thoughts of self-harm. According to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is the second-leading cause of death among young people ages 15-24. The CDC reported in 2017 that the number of girls 15-19 committing suicide had doubled from 2007 to 2015. The statistics cited show 5.1 suicides per 100,000 in that age group — a 40-year high. The boys suicide rate in that age group climbed 30 percent, to 14.2 per 100,000, in the same time period.

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Thursday, October 10 is World Mental Health Day. First celebrated in 1992, the day was set up by the World Federation for Mental Health to educate and raise awareness of mental health issues for people around the world.

Each year the event has a different theme. Suicide prevention is the primary focus for the 2019 theme for World Mental Health Day. Here are some key facts and figures about suicide from the World Health Organization:

  • Suicides are preventable.

National Suicide Prevention Week (“NSPW”) is September 8th-14th this year. Each year, the nation’s largest suicide prevention organization, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (“AFSP”), hosts NSPW. One focus of NSPW this year is: Creating A Safety Net.This blog is a little bit about how I created a Safety Net for myself, and why you need one, too.

Why Do You and I Need A Safety Net?

Each of us lives a life in which our experience of living may bring along some challenges. I venture that most would agree that life is not a linear or static journey -neither in a practical or emotional sense. Personally, I have found that this great sweep of things we call “Life,” although a wonderful journey, it has not been one of predictability. While I have enjoyed years of stability and joy, years of happiness, years of feeling inspired, I have also faced years of hard-times, loss, defeat and great suffering.

Suicide is a Leading Cause of Death in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) WISQARS Leading Causes of Death Reports, in 2017:

  • Suicide was the tenth leading cause of death overall in the United States, claiming the lives of over 47,000 people.
  • Suicide was the second leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34, and the fourth leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 35 and 54.
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